WJTV News Channel 12 - Early Season Snowfall in the East

Early Season Snowfall in the East

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Carolyn Howell, Ayden Carolyn Howell, Ayden

An early-season Arctic cold front brought just enough moisture to give eastern North Carolina a rare November snow event Tuesday evening.  Many areas received trace amounts of accumulation.  Is this round of wintry weather a record in eastern North Carolina? Well, according to an official reporting station in eastern North Carolina, New Bern received the earliest trace of frozen precipitation on November 3, 1954, nine days earlier than tonight’s November 12, 2013 event.

According to the National Weather Service weather records, Greenville’s earliest significant snow of 2.3 inches happened November 15, 1880.  Kinston received 2.2 inches of snow on November 20, 1914.  Williamston recorded 0.5 inches on November 24, 1935.  Washington also received 0.5 inches on November 29, 1903.  Additionally, Snow Hill and Belhaven received 2.5 inches and 2.0 inches respectively on November 24, 1935.

As far as trace amounts go, Greenville had a dusting of snow on November 9, 1913.  Snow Hill had a trace on November 14, 1905 and Kinston had a trace of snow on November 11, 1987.

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