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Dixie National Rodeo concludes, workers describe caring for Livestock

JACKSON, Miss (WJTV) - The 54th annual Dixie National Rodeo is wrapping up Wednesday at the Mississippi Coliseum giving folks in the hospitality state one last chance to see a western tradition.

Being declared the biggest rodeo east of the Mississippi the event needs many livestock to come and partake with all the competitors.

For a Wednesday night the Mississippi Coliseum was still pretty packed as folks enjoy events from bareback riding, steer wrestling, and of course bull riding. But none of these animals actually belong to those riding them.

No matter what age, any rodeo performer knows a good performance needs a good animal.

“It was all just really crazy and all wild and they ran really hard and I had to hustle,” Team Roper Peyton Stricklane said. “Some of them are slow, some of them are fast, and some of them are junky.”

With over 500 heads of livestock coming through the Dixie National Rodeo tending to them can be harder than performing.

“You got to know what you’re looking at you know if one gets sick the vets there to doctor him,” Arena Director Cody Whitney said. “Or figure out what’s wrong with him and the crew does an amazing job feeding and taking care of them.”

Many of the horses and bulls came to compete as far as Montana and Oklahoma. But some of the cattle came from right here in Mississippi.

“About 120 cattle here for the whole thing and we’ll probably take them home tonight put them on rye grass,” Crystal Springs Rancher TD Ramsey told us. “They’ll go back to the feed pins and that’s where they’ll be for the next few weeks and have a few days off.”

And when it comes to getting these two ton beasts ready rodeo officials tell me bulls actually can be easier to tend to compared to horses and steers.

“With the bulls it seems like they can always adjust a lot easier with the weather,” Whitney continued. “The only thing you got to watch with the bulls is when feeding them there’s always a couple armory ones in there that want to snort and hook at you.”

So there you have it the better the weather the slightly happier the bulls may be. Rodeo officials also told each horse and bull here can range from $20,000-$50,000 to buy and maintain which shows how crucial taking care of these creatures can be.


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