4th Annual National Day of Nonviolence Took Place In Jackson Saturday

Metro

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

The Fourth Annual Rally for Nonviolence took place along Sykes Road in Jackson . About 60 people gathered to shed light on the many people who have lost their lives to gun violence.

 

Not just on the streets of Jackson, but across the United States.

 

Robie Hays said ” I was in my apartment then I came out heard “Stop the Violence” when you hear stuff like that you running. I came out in my shorts, just woke up but came to support.”

 

Saturday was a day of camaraderie. Men, women and children joined together in peace to help put an end staggering statistics according to Jackson Police Department there have been 62 murders so far this year.

 

Organizers said they want gun violence out of their community. They said when one person is killed, it impacts everyone.

 

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

“We are losing our family everyday with street violence with gun violence. We want to take the opportunity to come in solidarity to come together to show that we want to bring awareness to what is going on around the community,” said Kareem Muhammad an organizer for National Day of Non Violence.

 

In attendance were families of Emmett Till. Also slain rapper Lil Lonnie. They said they were still suffering. They hoped their attendance would bring peace to others affected from the loss of a family member.

 

A family member of Emmett Till said “He never got a chance to become a young adult, the guy to date, a young husband or father. For his life to have been taken of violence, hate. We are out here to spread positivity in the community.”

 

“Come out show our support for ending gun violence. Making sure people know and understand why they need to put the guns down.  Get out here in the community to talk to other people who may have lost their loved ones to gun violence. We are trying to do whatever we can to end it,” said a family member of Lil Lonnie.

 

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

We also spoke to some officials like Councilman Dekeither Stamps, who said they believed more jobs, community outreach and youth engagement was a start to ending violence within the city. He said he and others were working on projects to encourage trust between youth and law enforcement.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trending Stories